Volume 5, Issue 1, January 2017, Page: 8-14
Effect of Soaked and Fermented African Locust Bean Seeds Meal on the Performance, Organs and Carcass Characteristics of Broiler Chickens
Mu’azu Shu’aibu. Tamburawa, Animal Science Department, Kano University of Science and Technology, Wudil, Nigeria
Samson Olabanji Ogundipe, Animal Science Department, Ahmadu Bello University Zaria, Samaru, Nigeria
Titus Samuel BabatundeTegbe, Animal Science Department, Ahmadu Bello University Zaria, Samaru, Nigeria
Taiye Sunday. Olugbemi, Animal Science Department, Ahmadu Bello University Zaria, Samaru, Nigeria
Muhammad Rabiu Hassan, Animal Science Department, Ahmadu Bello University Zaria, Samaru, Nigeria
Received: Jan. 5, 2017;       Accepted: Jan. 14, 2017;       Published: Feb. 22, 2017
DOI: 10.11648/j.avs.20170501.12      View  3737      Downloads  99
Abstract
This research was conducted to determine the performance, organs weights and carcass characteristics of broiler chickens fed diets containing soaked and fermented African locust bean (Parkia biglobosa) seed meal (SFALBSM). Five diets were formulated in which SFLSBM was included in the diets broilers at graded levels of 0, 7.5, 15, 22.5 and 30% designated as T1, T2, T3, T4 and T5 respectively. Two hundred and twenty five (225) broiler chickens (Marshall Strain) were fed these diets in a completely randomized design (CRD). Each treatment was replicated three times with 15 birds per replicate having forty five birds (45) per treatment. The experiment lasted 8weeks (4weeks for starter phase and 4week for finisher phase). At the end of the experiment, carcass analysis was carried out in which three birds were slaughtered from each replication. The results of performance at starter phase showed were significant differences (P<0.05) in the final body weight (734.25-919.89g), total weight gain (679.13–898.31g) and total feed intake (1572.39-1708.56g). The feed conversion ratio (1.87-2.31) were significantly (P<0.05) better for 15% SFALBSM diet compared to others. The results of performance of birds at finisher phase also showed there were significant differences (P < 0.05) in the final body weights (2312.73-2786.14g), total feed intake (4287.73-4373.88g), feed conversion ratio(3.05 -4.55) and feed cost per kilogram gain (N222.33–316.70). Broilers fed 15% SFALBSM had significantly higher (P<0.05) in weights compared to others (2786.14g). The values for carcass weight and dressing percentage were also significantly (P<0.05) higher for broilers fed 15% SFALBSM diet (1930.24 and 73.98% respectively). There were significant differences (P<0.05) in breast muscle (17.35%-21.97%), drum stick (10.74-11.60%) and thigh muscles (11.63-13.38%). There were significant differences (P<0.05) in the heart (0.49-0.50%), lungs (0.50–0.70%), liver (1.93-2.50%), pancreas (0.20–0.32%) and kidney weights (0.28-0.38%). Feed conversion ratio and feed cost per kilogram gain were better in broiler chickens fed 15% SFALBSM diets (3.26 and 222.33 N/kg gain respectively) compared to others. It was therefore concluded that soaked and fermented African locust bean seeds can be included in the diet of broiler chickens up to 15% without any detrimental effect on performance, carcass and organs weights.
Keywords
African Locust Bean Seed, Soaking and Fermentation, Broiler Chickens, Performance and Carcass Characteristics
To cite this article
Mu’azu Shu’aibu. Tamburawa, Samson Olabanji Ogundipe, Titus Samuel BabatundeTegbe, Taiye Sunday. Olugbemi, Muhammad Rabiu Hassan, Effect of Soaked and Fermented African Locust Bean Seeds Meal on the Performance, Organs and Carcass Characteristics of Broiler Chickens, Animal and Veterinary Sciences. Vol. 5, No. 1, 2017, pp. 8-14. doi: 10.11648/j.avs.20170501.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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