Volume 2, Issue 2, March 2014, Page: 18-21
Evaluation of the Proximate, Mineral, Phytochemical and Amino Acid Composition of Bidens Pilosa as Potential Feed/Feed Additive for Non-Ruminant Livestock
Philip Cheriose Nzien Alikwe, Animal Science Department, Niger Delta University, Yenagoa, Nigeria
Elijah Ige Ohimain, Biological Sciences Department, Niger Delta University, Yenagoa, Nigeria
Soladoye Mohammed Omotosho, SMO Laboratory Consult, 5 Joyce B Shopping Complex, Ibadan, Nigeria
Received: Jan. 28, 2014;       Published: Mar. 10, 2014
DOI: 10.11648/j.avs.20140202.11      View  3789      Downloads  368
Abstract
Bidens pilosa are popular weeds in the South West Region of Nigeria which are self-propagated by glueing itself on farmer’s dresses and animal’s skin. Bidens pilosa leaf meal (BPLM) were analyzed to determine proximate nutrient content, amino acid composition, phytochemicals and mineral constituents. The protein content of the leafmeal from the plant is 15.86%, These values are high compared to those for some common Nigerian weeds used as forage plants. Leaves had high percentage of crude fibre (18.13%). Carbohydrates, lipid, moisture and ash contents were within the range expected for dry leafy vegetable. Five (5) essential amino acids were found in varying proportions in the protein of Bidens pilosa Leafmeal. The phytochemicals analyzed indicated the presence of tannins, alkaloids, saponins, phenols and glycoside in the BPLM were lower than the range of values reported for most vegetables. Hence may serve as a good source of feed or feed additive for non-ruminants such as pigs, rabbits and guinea pigs.
Keywords
Bidens Pilosa, Amino Acid, Nutrients, Phytochemicals, Weeds
To cite this article
Philip Cheriose Nzien Alikwe, Elijah Ige Ohimain, Soladoye Mohammed Omotosho, Evaluation of the Proximate, Mineral, Phytochemical and Amino Acid Composition of Bidens Pilosa as Potential Feed/Feed Additive for Non-Ruminant Livestock, Animal and Veterinary Sciences. Vol. 2, No. 2, 2014, pp. 18-21. doi: 10.11648/j.avs.20140202.11
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